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CagePotato Presents: A Comprehensive Breakdown of the UFC’s PPV Numbers (And How They Can Improve Them)

(We will open the bidding for a UFC 149 pay-per-view purchase at $49.95. Do I hear $49.95? What if I said I’d thrown in this *authentic* jersey, completely free of charge? $49.95…anyone? OK, how about ten bucks?)  By Oliver Chan Recently, after reading 12OzCurl‘s article (well, just the opening paragraph) I came to a realization that the only reason why I‘m here is because I‘m Asian and Benny figures that must mean I‘m good with numbers. So break out your abacuses”¦this shit is about to get real. Today‘s class? Variable pricing and whether or not this system should be adopted by the UFC in regards to the pricing of pay-per-view events. I‘ll wait for everyone to decide whether or not to skip this article and go straight to the “Hot Potato” links. Still with me? Probably not. But anyways, here we go. For those that don‘t know, Variable Pricing (or Dynamic Pricing as it is called) has been the main pricing strategies for airlines and hotels on how they price their own inventory.  Recently, the San Francisco Giants adopted this form of pricing in order to better optimize ticket sales for their events. The strategy is similar to that used by the hotel and airline industry where prices go up and down depending on current market conditions and historical trends. Did it work? Hell yeah it did. By using sell-out history from past games based on opponents, starting pitchers, weather, day of the week, evening versus afternoon, and of course, current supply, the Giants were able to significantly increase their ticket sales revenue to such a degree that other franchises are looking to adopt similar methods to pricing their games.

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